The Stars Beckon

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This is a blog run by Deflare about space travel and exploration, and the beauty of the stars. I'm always looking for more material to post, so any art, photos, stories, or news articles you have to share would be appreciated!

(Note: If I mistag something or post something that the creator wants me to take down, please let me know in an Ask!)

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[Background from ForestGladesiWander]
[Header from Manfrommonster]

Theme by: Miguel
  1. NASA tested an impossible space engine and it somehow worked
  2. 192 Notes
    Reblogged: futurescope
  3. heythereuniverse:

    Companion Planets May Extend Habitability Lifespan | The Daily Galaxy

    For certain ancient planets orbiting smaller, older stars, the gravitational influence of an outer companion planet might generate enough energy through tidal heating to keep the closer-in world habitable even when its own internal fires burn out. But what would such a planet look like on its surface? Here, UW astronomer Rory Barnes provides a speculative illustration of a planet in the habitable zone of a star about the size of the sun. “The star would appear about 10 times larger in the sky than our sun, and the crescent is not a moon but a nearby Saturn-sized planet that maintains the tidal heating,” notes University of Washington astronomer Rory Barnes. “The sky is mostly dark because cool stars don’t emit much blue light, so the atmosphere doesn’t scatter it.”

    Having a companion in old age is good for people — and, it turns out, might extend the chance for life on certain Earth-sized planets in the cosmos as well.
    [Read more]
  4. 343 Notes
    Reblogged: heythereuniverse
  5. heythereuniverse:

Starburst Cluster Shows Celestial Fireworks | NASA Goddard Photo and Video

    heythereuniverse:

    Starburst Cluster Shows Celestial Fireworks | NASA Goddard Photo and Video

  6. 1185 Notes
    Reblogged: heythereuniverse
  7. mothernaturenetwork:

Did ancient Earth get a ‘face-lift’ from asteroids?The asteroid impacts could also explain the mysterious zircon minerals.

    mothernaturenetwork:

    Did ancient Earth get a ‘face-lift’ from asteroids?
    The asteroid impacts could also explain the mysterious zircon minerals.

  8. 206 Notes
    Reblogged: heythereuniverse
  9. colchrishadfield:

Cool flame - unexpected discovery up on Space Station that can affect fuel efficiency in cars.
http://www.jacobsschool.ucsd.edu/news/news_releases/release.sfe?id=1548

    colchrishadfield:

    Cool flame - unexpected discovery up on Space Station that can affect fuel efficiency in cars.

    http://www.jacobsschool.ucsd.edu/news/news_releases/release.sfe?id=1548

  10. 210 Notes
    Reblogged: colchrishadfield
  11. jtotheizzoe:

More Than Just Black…
Adam Elsheimer’s The Flight Into Egypt is considered the first known painting to accurately depict the stars of the night sky and the Milky Way. Can you find Ursa Major?
Interestingly, this painting is said to date from around 1609, yet that means it predates Galileo’s first published telescope observations by a year (Galileo’s Sidereus Nuncius was published in 1610, although he made observations in 1609), and he likely couldn’t have seen all this with the naked eye. Any art or science historians know the full story? 
It’s a beautiful thing to see that science has been influencing art for so long.

    jtotheizzoe:

    More Than Just Black…

    Adam Elsheimer’s The Flight Into Egypt is considered the first known painting to accurately depict the stars of the night sky and the Milky Way. Can you find Ursa Major?

    Interestingly, this painting is said to date from around 1609, yet that means it predates Galileo’s first published telescope observations by a year (Galileo’s Sidereus Nuncius was published in 1610, although he made observations in 1609), and he likely couldn’t have seen all this with the naked eye. Any art or science historians know the full story? 

    It’s a beautiful thing to see that science has been influencing art for so long.

  12. 393 Notes
    Reblogged: jtotheizzoe
  13. jtotheizzoe:

    I think of all the -ographies, “selenography” is my favorite.

    Enjoy these historical atlases of the moon, the earliest studies of the moon’s surface features (AKA “selenography”). The above were drawn by:

    • Michel van Langren (1645)
    • Johannes Hevelius (1647)
    • Giovanni Cassini (1679)
    • Tobias Mayer (1749)
    • Richard Andree (1881)
    • Henry White Warren (1879)

    Previously: Check out Galileo’s watercolor illustrations of the moon, and find out how a few simple sketches realigned the heavens.

  14. 1324 Notes
    Reblogged: jtotheizzoe
  15. jtotheizzoe:

ellliot:

gnostic-forest:

emkaymlp:

mj-the-scientist:

invaderxan:

Mars. In true colour.
Just so you know, a lot of images of Mars which you’ll see have been manipulated. A lot of them have boosted contrast and saturation. So if you’ve ever wondered – images like this one are what Mars actually looks like.

Why does this not have more notes?!?
YOU ARE LITERALLY LOOKING THROUGH THE EYES OF A ROBOT ON ANOTHER FUCKING PLANET
If you don’t think that’s the tightest shit, you can get out of my face.

i wanted to reblog this so that everyone who sees it can realize just how amazing this is. you are looking at a photograph taken on an entirely different planet. an entire world that has been completely untouched by humanity until only recently. no human in the history of mankind has ever look at those rocks, the soil, the mountains, and the sky until now. and until we finally manage to set foot there for the very first time, no human has ever seen mars from this perspective with their own two eyes or feel the texture of the martian soil on the bottom of their boots. this was only possible by creating a robot, an actual robot, and shooting way out of the reaches of earth and with extremely careful calculations, have it safely land and deploy right where they want it. it’s a robot on another planet being controlled 225 million kilometers away, seeing and studying and sending information for us.
this is the sort of thing you would see in science fiction movies that are only a few decades old. what was only imagination and possibilities back then is now all in this photograph. im looking forward to see what happens in the coming decades

I’m so infatuated by this. 

225 million kilometers away and we got it on film that blows my mind

This isn’t what the real Mars looks like, the real one’s in 3-D

    jtotheizzoe:

    ellliot:

    gnostic-forest:

    emkaymlp:

    mj-the-scientist:

    invaderxan:

    Mars. In true colour.

    Just so you know, a lot of images of Mars which you’ll see have been manipulated. A lot of them have boosted contrast and saturation. So if you’ve ever wondered – images like this one are what Mars actually looks like.

    Why does this not have more notes?!?

    YOU ARE LITERALLY LOOKING THROUGH THE EYES OF A ROBOT ON ANOTHER FUCKING PLANET

    If you don’t think that’s the tightest shit, you can get out of my face.

    i wanted to reblog this so that everyone who sees it can realize just how amazing this is. you are looking at a photograph taken on an entirely different planet. an entire world that has been completely untouched by humanity until only recently. no human in the history of mankind has ever look at those rocks, the soil, the mountains, and the sky until now. and until we finally manage to set foot there for the very first time, no human has ever seen mars from this perspective with their own two eyes or feel the texture of the martian soil on the bottom of their boots. this was only possible by creating a robot, an actual robot, and shooting way out of the reaches of earth and with extremely careful calculations, have it safely land and deploy right where they want it. it’s a robot on another planet being controlled 225 million kilometers away, seeing and studying and sending information for us.

    this is the sort of thing you would see in science fiction movies that are only a few decades old. what was only imagination and possibilities back then is now all in this photograph. im looking forward to see what happens in the coming decades

    I’m so infatuated by this. 

    225 million kilometers away and we got it on film that blows my mind

    This isn’t what the real Mars looks like, the real one’s in 3-D

  16. 150747 Notes
    Reblogged: jtotheizzoe
  17. jtotheizzoe:

Message From the Moon
At first glance, these probably come across as little more than hastily painted watercolor sketches of the moon. That’s precisely what they are, actually. Attractive, yes, but certainly not high art.  
But hiding in their shadows lies a greater significance. The squiggled edges of that bleeding ink bear an observation that altered the heavens themselves. Or at the very least, our view of them.
The hand that traced these orbs belonged to none other than Galileo Galilei. They were included in his 1610 work Sidereus Nuncius (“The Sidereal Message”, which would make a great band name), the first scientific text based on telescope observations. To understand the significance of his illustrations, it helps to understand the world in which he drew them.

In 1610, cosmology, not that it had much to show for itself as a science, was still based on the ideas of Aristotle, who by this time had been dead for 18 centuries. So current! Copernicus’ observation that the Earth orbited the sun, first published in 1543, had begun to challenge Aristotelian supremacy, it wasn’t exactly a popular idea. 
Aristotle’s cosmological beliefs were based on the idea that the heavens were made of a perfect substance called “aether”, and therefore the circular motions and spherical shapes of heavenly bodies were also perfect. Earth, he claimed, was inherently imperfect, as were all the things that existed upon it. Everything in the heavens was awesome, and Earthly matter was inherently “just okay”, even if its name was Aristotle. This was one of the reasons people found Copernicus’ claims so hard to swallow. The imperfect Earth among the perfect heavens? Heresy!
Enter Galileo and his humble 20x telescope, in 1609. At the time, in Aristotelian fashion, the moon, being of the heavens, was assumed to be a perfect sphere, its dark and light areas just splotches upon the billiard-ball-smooth lunar surface. I imagine it took Galileo about 7 seconds of lunar observation to realize that was not the case.

The terminator, that line that separates the moon’s illuminated face from its dark one, is jagged as a crocodile’s smile. I’ve seen it myself through modern telescopes, and I must say, it’s really something to witness how light and shadow break over a distant crater’s edge. Galileo painted this in his sketches above, inferring that the moon in fact had a rough and crater-marked face. This meant that not only was Earth not the center of the universe, as Copernicus had shown, but the heavens themselves were imperfect, just like Earth.
Scientists would go on to realize that the orbits of heavenly bodies were not perfect circles, nor were the bodies perfect spheres, and that everything up there is made of the same stuff as everything down here. It was either a huge demotion for the heavens, or a great promotion for Earth, I’m not sure.
Galileo’s Sidereus Nuncius also included newly detailed maps of the constellations and the mention of four moons of Jupiter (although detailed observations of those were still centuries away), but it was his drawings of our moon that bore the most impact on future astronomical science, realigning the heavens with a single stroke of the brush.
Keep on drawing, and keep on looking up.
(You can read an English translation of Sidereus Nuncius here. If you’re hungry for more selenology, tour through these historical maps of the moon. Tip of the telescope to Steve Silberman for tweeting these sketches.)

    jtotheizzoe:

    Message From the Moon

    At first glance, these probably come across as little more than hastily painted watercolor sketches of the moon. That’s precisely what they are, actually. Attractive, yes, but certainly not high art.  

    But hiding in their shadows lies a greater significance. The squiggled edges of that bleeding ink bear an observation that altered the heavens themselves. Or at the very least, our view of them.

    The hand that traced these orbs belonged to none other than Galileo Galilei. They were included in his 1610 work Sidereus Nuncius (“The Sidereal Message”, which would make a great band name), the first scientific text based on telescope observations. To understand the significance of his illustrations, it helps to understand the world in which he drew them.

    In 1610, cosmology, not that it had much to show for itself as a science, was still based on the ideas of Aristotle, who by this time had been dead for 18 centuries. So current! Copernicus’ observation that the Earth orbited the sun, first published in 1543, had begun to challenge Aristotelian supremacy, it wasn’t exactly a popular idea. 

    Aristotle’s cosmological beliefs were based on the idea that the heavens were made of a perfect substance called “aether”, and therefore the circular motions and spherical shapes of heavenly bodies were also perfect. Earth, he claimed, was inherently imperfect, as were all the things that existed upon it. Everything in the heavens was awesome, and Earthly matter was inherently “just okay”, even if its name was Aristotle. This was one of the reasons people found Copernicus’ claims so hard to swallow. The imperfect Earth among the perfect heavens? Heresy!

    Enter Galileo and his humble 20x telescope, in 1609. At the time, in Aristotelian fashion, the moon, being of the heavens, was assumed to be a perfect sphere, its dark and light areas just splotches upon the billiard-ball-smooth lunar surface. I imagine it took Galileo about 7 seconds of lunar observation to realize that was not the case.

    The terminator, that line that separates the moon’s illuminated face from its dark one, is jagged as a crocodile’s smile. I’ve seen it myself through modern telescopes, and I must say, it’s really something to witness how light and shadow break over a distant crater’s edge. Galileo painted this in his sketches above, inferring that the moon in fact had a rough and crater-marked face. This meant that not only was Earth not the center of the universe, as Copernicus had shown, but the heavens themselves were imperfect, just like Earth.

    Scientists would go on to realize that the orbits of heavenly bodies were not perfect circles, nor were the bodies perfect spheres, and that everything up there is made of the same stuff as everything down here. It was either a huge demotion for the heavens, or a great promotion for Earth, I’m not sure.

    Galileo’s Sidereus Nuncius also included newly detailed maps of the constellations and the mention of four moons of Jupiter (although detailed observations of those were still centuries away), but it was his drawings of our moon that bore the most impact on future astronomical science, realigning the heavens with a single stroke of the brush.

    Keep on drawing, and keep on looking up.

    (You can read an English translation of Sidereus Nuncius here. If you’re hungry for more selenology, tour through these historical maps of the moon. Tip of the telescope to Steve Silberman for tweeting these sketches.)

  18. 556 Notes
    Reblogged: jtotheizzoe
  19. heythereuniverse:

A Cosmic Exclamation Point  | NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center
  20. 218 Notes
    Reblogged: heythereuniverse