The Stars Beckon

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This is a blog run by Deflare about space travel and exploration, and the beauty of the stars. I'm always looking for more material to post, so any art, photos, stories, or news articles you have to share would be appreciated!

(Note: If I mistag something or post something that the creator wants me to take down, please let me know in an Ask!)

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  1. natgeofound:

A young girl plays in a replica of a lunar-module in Toronto, Canada, August 1975.Photograph by Robert Madden, National Geographic Creative

    natgeofound:

    A young girl plays in a replica of a lunar-module in Toronto, Canada, August 1975.Photograph by Robert Madden, National Geographic Creative

  2. 7370 Notes
    Reblogged: teal-deer
  3. heythereuniverse:

    Dark was the Night // Blind Willie Johnson

    I came across this song on Cosmos: A Space Time Odyssey, where Neil deGrasse Tyson first introduced The Golden Record—which is a symbolic message-in-a-bottle sent out into interstellar space on Voyager I intended for any extraterrestrial life forms who may find it. The Golden Record contains various sounds and images that were selected to portray the diversity of life and culture on Earth.

    This is my very first time hearing this full song, and nothing—so far, nothing, no sorts of music that I’ve ever heard of— had ever touched me in this way. I’m sitting here right now chest swelling and almost in tears. This is probably the most beautiful song that I’ve ever heard.

    And to think that it’s on its way into the universe with the possibility that someone else maybe somewhere out there may find it— that was the most comforting thought. Because it felt like such a profound representation of mankind. Because it felt really human. 

  4. 80 Notes
    Reblogged: heythereuniverse
  5. heythereuniverse:

Perseid Meteor Shower | Alexis Birkill Photography
  6. 267 Notes
    Reblogged: heythereuniverse
  7. newsweek:

Astronauts fresh off spacewalks often report that a certain faint, acrid smell tends to cling to their equipment. NASA astronaut Don Pettit described it as “a rather pleasant sweet metallic sensation” akin to “welding fumes,” while others have said it reminds them of charred meat.
They were probably smelling polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are compounds produced when stars and planets form. According to Jeff Oishi, a research scientist at the Museum of Natural History in New York, PAHs are present on Earth too—they’re produced when you BBQ! But if you travel 26,000 light years to a dust cloud at the center of the Milky Way called Sagittarius B2, you might catch a whiff of raspberries and maybe rum.
This cloud is stuffed with ethyl formate, an ester that gives both treats their flavor. “Space is pretty boozy,” Oishi says. “There’s no liquid alcohol, but a lot of different kinds of alcohols have been observed.” The constellation Aquila contains enough space booze that, if liquefied, it could fill 400 trillion trillion pints. Interstellar pub crawl, anyone?
What Does Space Smell Like? | Mental Floss

    newsweek:

    Astronauts fresh off spacewalks often report that a certain faint, acrid smell tends to cling to their equipment. NASA astronaut Don Pettit described it as “a rather pleasant sweet metallic sensation” akin to “welding fumes,” while others have said it reminds them of charred meat.

    They were probably smelling polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are compounds produced when stars and planets form. According to Jeff Oishi, a research scientist at the Museum of Natural History in New York, PAHs are present on Earth too—they’re produced when you BBQ! But if you travel 26,000 light years to a dust cloud at the center of the Milky Way called Sagittarius B2, you might catch a whiff of raspberries and maybe rum.

    This cloud is stuffed with ethyl formate, an ester that gives both treats their flavor. “Space is pretty boozy,” Oishi says. “There’s no liquid alcohol, but a lot of different kinds of alcohols have been observed.” The constellation Aquila contains enough space booze that, if liquefied, it could fill 400 trillion trillion pints. Interstellar pub crawl, anyone?

    What Does Space Smell Like? | Mental Floss

  8. 1027 Notes
    Reblogged: itsfullofstars
  9. wildcat2030:

This is what your home on Mars could look like -NASA JPL and Makerbot have announced the winners of their Thingiverse Mars Base challenge to design and 3D print a human habitat for the Red Planet. - Humans living on Mars is a fascinating concept. We already have Mars One looking to establish a Mars colony, and NASA planning manned missions to the Red Planet, with one objective being to assess the feasibility of living there; whether Mars has the resources necessary for human survival, and whether we have the technology to create what we need. While, however, it’s still a distant dream, that hasn’t stopped people from thinking about how we might live if we get there. Recently, NASA and Makerbot held the Mars Base challenge: to design human habitation, using materials either found on Mars or brought from Earth, that could be 3D printed. With 228 submissions on Thingiverse, the competition was fierce — but the three top designs are in, with the first place winner receiving a MakerBot Replicator Desktop 3D printer and spools of MakerBot PLA filament going to second and third. (via This is what your home on Mars could look like - CNET)

    wildcat2030:

    This is what your home on Mars could look like
    -
    NASA JPL and Makerbot have announced the winners of their Thingiverse Mars Base challenge to design and 3D print a human habitat for the Red Planet.
    -
    Humans living on Mars is a fascinating concept. We already have Mars One looking to establish a Mars colony, and NASA planning manned missions to the Red Planet, with one objective being to assess the feasibility of living there; whether Mars has the resources necessary for human survival, and whether we have the technology to create what we need. While, however, it’s still a distant dream, that hasn’t stopped people from thinking about how we might live if we get there. Recently, NASA and Makerbot held the Mars Base challenge: to design human habitation, using materials either found on Mars or brought from Earth, that could be 3D printed. With 228 submissions on Thingiverse, the competition was fierce — but the three top designs are in, with the first place winner receiving a MakerBot Replicator Desktop 3D printer and spools of MakerBot PLA filament going to second and third. (via This is what your home on Mars could look like - CNET)

  10. 650 Notes
    Reblogged: futurescope
  11. heythereuniverse:

Ophiuchus Rho with Antares and M4 | VisualUniverse

    heythereuniverse:

    Ophiuchus Rho with Antares and M4 | VisualUniverse

  12. 912 Notes
    Reblogged: heythereuniverse
  13. jtotheizzoe:

    staceythinx:

    School’s about to start. Why settle for boring binders when you can get these space binders from my Thinx Shop on Zazzle?

    If people actually still use binders then I gotta say these are 100% the binders you need to have.

  14. 548 Notes
    Reblogged: jtotheizzoe
  15. heythereuniverse:

Orion Nebula | VisualUniverse
  16. 459 Notes
    Reblogged: heythereuniverse
  17. jtotheizzoe:

    Sun of a Million Earths

    The sun is big. Really big. Big enough to hold about a million Earths, by volume.

    But our brains aren’t good with visualizing big numbers. So what does a million Earths look like?

    Thanks to Chris Jones and his visualization at Space Facts, you can find out. Check it out. Prepare to scroll! 

  18. 384 Notes
    Reblogged: jtotheizzoe
  19. thedemon-hauntedworld:

The Slant on Saturn’s Rings

This image from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope shows Saturn’s Southern Hemisphere and the southern face of its rings in Infrared light. 

Saturn experiences seasonal tilts away from and toward the Sun, much the same way Earth does, over the course of its 29.5-year orbit. This means that approximately every 30 years, we can catch Saturn with its rings at their maximum tilt of 27 degrees toward Earth and get the best glimpse of Saturn’s South Pole and the southern side of the planet’s rings.

Credit: NASA/ESA and E. Karkoschka (University of Arizona)

    thedemon-hauntedworld:

    The Slant on Saturn’s Rings

    This image from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope shows Saturn’s Southern Hemisphere and the southern face of its rings in Infrared light.

    Saturn experiences seasonal tilts away from and toward the Sun, much the same way Earth does, over the course of its 29.5-year orbit. This means that approximately every 30 years, we can catch Saturn with its rings at their maximum tilt of 27 degrees toward Earth and get the best glimpse of Saturn’s South Pole and the southern side of the planet’s rings.

    Credit: NASA/ESA and E. Karkoschka (University of Arizona)

  20. 1841 Notes
    Reblogged: acyanrust