The Stars Beckon

RSS | Random | Archive

About Me

This is a blog run by Deflare about space travel and exploration, and the beauty of the stars. I'm always looking for more material to post, so any art, photos, stories, or news articles you have to share would be appreciated!

(Note: If I mistag something or post something that the creator wants me to take down, please let me know in an Ask!)

[Icon from Sir1]
[Background from ForestGladesiWander]
[Header from Manfrommonster]

Theme by: Miguel
  1. jtotheizzoe:

Another New Earth… Or Not.
You may have heard the news last week that astronomers discovered the best candidate to date for an Earth-like planet. Kepler-186f is a rocky planet that is, like other so-called “second Earths”, the right distance away from its parent star to have liquid water on its surface and maybe have the right conditions for maybe having life if that’s the kind of thing that maybe exists somewhere else… maybe.
As Adam Mann writes for WIRED, there’s a lot we don’t know about this exoplanet, and a lot that makes it not very Earth-like. Like the fact that its star is way different from ours. And that we haven’t imaged it directly. Matt Francis adds his two cents at The Daily Beast, noting that a planet that close to its parent star is tidally locked, with the same side facing, and being baked by, its parent star all the time. Sounds like it’s more of an Earth-cousin at best.
It’s not right to call this planet a “New Earth” (and I can almost guarantee that the Face of Boe does not and will not ever live there), because there’s just too much that we don’t know about it. The same goes for other exoplanets: For every question they answer they force us to ask three more. But that’s science. What is cool about this latest discovery is that it shows us just how many types of stars, even weird ones like the M class red dwarf that 186f orbits, can harbor Earth-ish planets in their habitable zone. 
The more we discover, the stronger the case that life exists somewhere, elsewhere. If you’d like to know more about our search for exoplanets and the life we hope they harbor, I did two videos on that for IOTBS. Watch ‘em below:
Exoplanets: Are There Other Earths?

Is There Intelligent Life Beyond Earth?

(Image via NASA)

    jtotheizzoe:

    Another New Earth… Or Not.

    You may have heard the news last week that astronomers discovered the best candidate to date for an Earth-like planet. Kepler-186f is a rocky planet that is, like other so-called “second Earths”, the right distance away from its parent star to have liquid water on its surface and maybe have the right conditions for maybe having life if that’s the kind of thing that maybe exists somewhere else… maybe.

    As Adam Mann writes for WIRED, there’s a lot we don’t know about this exoplanet, and a lot that makes it not very Earth-like. Like the fact that its star is way different from ours. And that we haven’t imaged it directly. Matt Francis adds his two cents at The Daily Beast, noting that a planet that close to its parent star is tidally locked, with the same side facing, and being baked by, its parent star all the time. Sounds like it’s more of an Earth-cousin at best.

    It’s not right to call this planet a “New Earth” (and I can almost guarantee that the Face of Boe does not and will not ever live there), because there’s just too much that we don’t know about it. The same goes for other exoplanets: For every question they answer they force us to ask three more. But that’s science. What is cool about this latest discovery is that it shows us just how many types of stars, even weird ones like the M class red dwarf that 186f orbits, can harbor Earth-ish planets in their habitable zone.

    The more we discover, the stronger the case that life exists somewhere, elsewhere. If you’d like to know more about our search for exoplanets and the life we hope they harbor, I did two videos on that for IOTBS. Watch ‘em below:

    Exoplanets: Are There Other Earths?

    Is There Intelligent Life Beyond Earth?

    (Image via NASA)

  2. 452 Notes
    Reblogged: jtotheizzoe
  3. futureofscience:

This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First Cousin
Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home.
NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered.
It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute.

    futureofscience:

    This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First Cousin

    Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home.

    NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered.

    It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute.

  4. 342 Notes
    Reblogged: futureofscience
  5. jtotheizzoe:

    I have a feeling that silk scarves printed with NASA satellite and Hubble images are a thing that some of you might need, in a “shut up and take my money” way.

    Check ‘em out at Slow Factory.

  6. 1126 Notes
    Reblogged: jtotheizzoe
  7. NASA's Kepler Discovers First Earth-Size Planet In The 'Habitable Zone' of Another Star
  8. 247 Notes
    Reblogged: itsfullofstars
  9. jtotheizzoe:

Yuichi Takasaka’s lunar eclipse photo is better than your lunar eclipse photo.
Taken over Waterton Lakes National Park in Alberta. See those other specks chasing the Moon? Those aren’t lens flares, they’re fellow celestial bodies including Mars, Jupiter, and the star Spica.

    jtotheizzoe:

    Yuichi Takasaka’s lunar eclipse photo is better than your lunar eclipse photo.

    Taken over Waterton Lakes National Park in Alberta. See those other specks chasing the Moon? Those aren’t lens flares, they’re fellow celestial bodies including Mars, Jupiter, and the star Spica.

  10. 1413 Notes
    Reblogged: jtotheizzoe
  11. 153130 Notes
    Reblogged: teal-deer
  12. benjamingrimes:

Blood Moon eclipse. Next time I’m going to rent a longer lens.
4/15/14

    benjamingrimes:

    Blood Moon eclipse. Next time I’m going to rent a longer lens.

    4/15/14

  13. 16798 Notes
    Reblogged: itsfullofstars
  14. jtotheizzoe:

Dust (the zodiacal light) pointing at dust (the Milky Way band)
One is the remnants of our solar system’s birth, and the other holds the seeds for solar systems dead and yet to come. Some more dusty goodness to go along with this week’s dusty episode of IOTBS on YouTube.
Photo by the superbly talented Cory Schmitz (Flickr, used with permission)

    jtotheizzoe:

    Dust (the zodiacal light) pointing at dust (the Milky Way band)

    One is the remnants of our solar system’s birth, and the other holds the seeds for solar systems dead and yet to come. Some more dusty goodness to go along with this week’s dusty episode of IOTBS on YouTube.

    Photo by the superbly talented Cory Schmitz (Flickr, used with permission)

  15. 463 Notes
    Reblogged: jtotheizzoe
  16. jtotheizzoe:

    Wanna get dirty with me?

    From star stuff to microscopic fluff to skin cells that slough while you’re in the buff, the universe of dust is curious enough to turn your mind into a cream puff.

    May this week’s episode spread like dust on the wind.

    Enjoy this video? Subscribe to It’s Okay To be Smart on YouTube!

  17. 292 Notes
    Reblogged: jtotheizzoe
  18. jtotheizzoe:

    skunkbear:

    A musical reminder of tonight’s full lunar eclipse!

    Tonight, for the first time since 2011, folks in North America will get the chance to see a total lunar eclipse.  It’s supposed to start in earnest around 2 AM on the east coast (11 PM west coast).

    Unfortunately I think clouds will spoil the fun for me (and most people on the east coast). But I woke with this song stuck in my head and ended up recording it before I headed out for work with my phone. (My sincerest apologies to Bonnie Tyler)

    You can find more detailed information about the eclipse here.

    And if you miss it this time, good news: Another blood moon is forecast for October, and again next April.

    The eclipse photo I use in the video was taken in 2011 by Fred Espenak (NASA Marshall Space Center).

    Related to the last, but in musical form.

  19. 284 Notes
    Reblogged: jtotheizzoe